Category Archives: Uncategorized

Garner’s Usage Tip of the Day: kidnapping (1).

kidnapping (1). Today: Spelling. Spell-check programs notwithstanding, the spelling with “-pp-” is preferred by convention. But the inferior spelling “kidnaping” occasionally appears. That spelling has its defenders — e.g.: “The form with a single ‘p’ is to be preferred because … Continue reading

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Garner’s Usage Tip of the Day: just.

just. Like “only,” “just” must be carefully placed — e.g.: “Texas’ Danny Peoples . . . had a two-run double and just hit foul a ball that could have been a two-run, game-tying homer.” Kirk Bohls, “Dallas Baptist Assaults Texas … Continue reading

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LawProse Lesson #185: What is an en-dash?

What is an en-dash? The en-dash is distinct from the hyphen and the em-dash. Conscientious writers know how to use the en-dash correctly; conscientious readers will appreciate the writer’s effort to effectively distinguish between the marks. Here are the basics. … Continue reading

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Garner’s Usage Tip of the Day: jurist.

jurist. Part A: Generally. In British English, this word is reserved for one who has made outstanding contributions to legal thought and legal literature. In American English, it is loosely applied to every judge of whatever level, and sometimes even … Continue reading

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Garner’s Usage Tip of the Day: Miscellaneous Entries.

Miscellaneous Entries. interregnum. The plural is “interregnums” or (less good) “interregna.” interrogate is a formal word for “question”; it suggests formal or rigorous questioning. interrogatee; interrogee. Webster’s Third lists “interrogee” (= someone interrogated), not “interrogatee.” But the OED lists “interrogatee,” … Continue reading

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Garner’s Usage Tip of the Day: judicial; judicious.

judicial; judicious. “Judicial” = (1) of, relating to, or by the court {judicial officers}; (2) in court {judicial admissions}; (3) legal {the Attorney General took no judicial action}; or (4) of or relating to a judgment {judicial interest at the … Continue reading

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Garner’s Usage Tip of the Day: judgment.

judgment. Part A: Spelling. “Judgment” is the preferred form in American English and in British legal texts, even as far back as the 19th century. “Judgement” is prevalent in British nonlegal texts and was thought by H.W. Fowler to be … Continue reading

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LawProse Lesson #184: Parentheses or em-dashes? How do you decide?

Parentheses or em-dashes? How do you decide? Good writers use parentheses and em-dashes skillfully to tighten and strengthen their prose. Although a writer’s individual style—together with the information or message to be conveyed—determines how these marks are used, some guidelines … Continue reading

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Garner’s Usage Tip of the Day: judge; justice.

judge; justice. In American English, as a general rule, judges sitting on the highest appellate level of a jurisdiction are known as “justices.” Trial judges and appellate judges on intermediate levels are generally called “judges,” not “justices.” New York and … Continue reading

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Garner’s Usage Tip of the Day: Miscellaneous Entries.

Miscellaneous Entries. interface, v.i., is jargonmongers’ talk — e.g.: “This man possesses the ability to interface and relate with people from all social and economic levels.” “Interface” should be left to computerese. intermezzo is pronounced /in-tuhr-MET-soh/ or /in-tuhr-MED-zoh/, but not … Continue reading

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