Author Archives: Bryan A. Garner

Garner’s Usage Tip of the Day: Miscellaneous Entries.

Miscellaneous Entries. ipse dixit (lit., “he himself said it”) = something said but not proved; a dogmatic statement — e.g.: “[Justice William Brennan's] real doctrine always showed through. It was the doctrine of ipse dixit: He has said it, so … Continue reading

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Lesson #189 (Part 2): Edits to the exercise.

Our edited version. We hope you enjoyed testing your editing skills! Here’s our revised version: Marcus Doyle moves to extend the pretrial-filing deadline and respectfully states: On August 4, 2014, this Court ordered Doyle, under Rule 16(b), to submit a … Continue reading

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LawProse Lesson #189: Test your editing skills!

Test your editing skills! In our last three lessons, we’ve discussed various tips for legal editing. (See Lesson #186, Lesson #187, and Lesson #188.) Now it’s time for you to put those techniques into practice. Try your hand at editing … Continue reading

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Garner’s Usage Tip of the Day: larynx.

larynx. “Larynx” /LAR-ingks/ is sometimes, through metathesis, mispronounced /LAR-uh-niks/ or /LAHR-niks/. From the latter mispronunciation comes the inevitable misspelling — e.g.: o “[Ken] Raabe [a puppeteer] uses an object called a swazzle, a kind of small artificial larnyx [read 'larynx'] … Continue reading

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LawProse Lesson #188: A few additional editing tips.

A few additional editing tips. In our last two lessons, we explained the LawProse editing method in general (Lesson #186), and we recommended changing be-verbs to action verbs (Lesson #187). Before we give you a full passage to edit on … Continue reading

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Garner’s Usage Tip of the Day: laissez-faire; laisser-faire.

laissez-faire; laisser-faire. The former spelling has long been standard. Some British publications, however, continue to use the outmoded spelling (“laisser”) — e.g.: o “Should Hongkong’s laisser-faire [read 'laissez-faire'] government do an about-face to build Hongkong Inc?” “Farewell to Adam Smith,” … Continue reading

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Garner’s Usage Tip of the Day: lady.

lady. This word has become increasingly problematic. Though hardly anyone would object to it in the phrase “ladies and gentlemen” or on a restroom sign, most other uses of the term might invite disapproval — depending on the readers’ or … Continue reading

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Garner’s Usage Tip of the Day: laden.

laden. Part A: As a Past Participle Equivalent to “loaded.” “Laden” survives today as a participial adjective {a laden barge} and not as a past participle. To use “laden” as a part of the verb phrase is to be guilty … Continue reading

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Garner’s Usage Tip of the Day: Miscellaneous Entries.

Miscellaneous Entries. introductory should never be used in the phrase “be introductory of” (something); one should instead write “introduce” — e.g.: “This first section is introductory of [read "introduces"] some of the tenets that constitute part of that framework.” As … Continue reading

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Garner’s Usage Tip of the Day: lacuna.

lacuna. “Lacuna” is a formal word for “gap” — e.g.: o “‘London Bridge’ . . . isn’t likely to answer the question, since it simply fills a literary lacuna.” Book Rev., “Celine Away,” Village Voice, 11 July 1995, at 12. … Continue reading

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